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Application Process: Frequently Asked Questions

1. What are the major steps in the grant process?

a. The Grants Oversight Committee first screens the application to determine if the proposal should be scheduled for a liaison review. This review applies to grants seeking $1,000 or more in funding (requests that are not for mini-grant funding). Basic criteria the Grants Oversight Committee will consider include: does the grant fit within the mission of the Columbus Jewish Foundation? Is the program needed in the community? Is the Columbus Jewish Foundation an appropriate funder? Is the organization in a position to implement the grant?

b. Applications approved by the Grants Oversight Committee will be scheduled for a meeting with the appropriate liaison review body. Approval by the Grants Oversight Committee is not a guarantee of Foundation funding.

c. Following review and subsequent committee meeting, final authority rests with the Foundation Board. Please do not expect any “update calls” while your grant application is being processed.

2. What factors do the grant committees take into consideration?

First, the committees address the application itself — is it meritorious, doable, does it relate to the mission of the institution and the goals of the Foundation, does the program match the goals and objectives that have been defined, can the program be evaluated and how will this be done? Second, the committees consider all of the applications they deem to be meritorious against available funds.

3. Does one part of the application warrant more attention than another?

No, all parts of the application are equally important. Nonetheless, it is helpful if:

  • typographical errors, grammar and readability are checked,
  • goals are measurable, program design meets goals, evaluation can measure the goals,
  • goals can be defined qualitatively and quantitatively…how will consumers be impacted, how many will be impacted and how often (for example),
  • there is real thought as to how the program will be funded after Foundation funding is no longer available (for long-term programs),
  • there is a true partnership with the Foundation in the risk-taking nature of a new and innovative program, such that it is understood that the Foundation does not fully fund programs and that the sponsoring institution will seek out other funding sources (including its own).

4. What if I am partnering with another organization?

Requests submitted jointly or in cooperation with other organizations are encouraged. All applications, including those that are jointly sponsored, must be approved by each governing board and signed by each executive director and president (or other designated officer). In instances where a department of a larger organization submits the application, the larger organization’s governing board must approve and the executive director and president (or designated officer) must sign the application.

5. Is my past performance on grants considered by the committee?

Yes. If the committee suggested ways in which an institution can enhance its applications or the types of grants they submit and the institution does not care to reflect on what has been suggested, that might be taken into consideration. Or if the institution was consistently reminded about including the appropriate publicity language (as listed in the grant agreement) in its publicity. If past programs of an institution did not succeed because the institution was not delivering the program or service that was expected, that also could be considered. And, if evaluations of completed programs were not submitted on a timely basis, that would be noted.

6. What kind of assistance can I expect from the Foundation professionals?

Foundation professionals will assist you in understanding the grants process and will meet with you to explore program ideas that are of interest to you. The Foundation staff does not write grant applications.

7. How can I track where my application is in the grant process?

Click here to see the grant process flowchart.